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News

  • Seasoned firewood ready now!

    It certainly is the weather for a log fire or stove and I am pleased to say we have plenty of great quality firewood available. At the moment it is nearly all ash which is the best wood to burn – being naturally low in moisture and having a high calorific value. So please give us a call because at £65 per ton bag it’s the best value in London!

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  • We are Arboricultural Association Approved Contractors!

    We were delighted to receive our welcome pack from the Arboricultural Association this morning confirming we are now Approved Contractors (AAAC)! This is the highest accreditation possible in our industry and brings with it automatic qualification for CHAS (Construction Health and Safety Scheme) and Trust Mark. We were assessed not only on Health and Safety but also on the quality of our work and customer service. The assessment is very detailed and is not a desk top process, but actually involves an auditor visiting us for a whole day. They undertake detailed assessments of work undertaken as well as attending a large tree...

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  • National Tree Week 2016

    As unpredictable as the weather is in the UK, November is celebrated as being the best time of year to plant trees. Factors such as stable temperatures and high rainfall levels help roots to grow and settle before winter arrives. Trees planted in November also require less aftercare than trees planted in other seasons, because of this, an annual event was launched to coincide with this. National Tree Week is the UK’s biggest annual festival of trees and it aims on encouraging a positive attitude about planting trees. This year, National Tree Week is running from Saturday 26th November to...

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  • The Great British Conker Apocalypse

    Experts have warned that the playground classic, the conker, could be wiped out in just 15 years. The population of the horse chestnut tree is under threat due to an invasion of an exotic pest combined with the spread of a killer disease. Leaf Miner The horse chestnut leaf miner originally observed in Greece has spread throughout central and Eastern Europe during the late 1980’s and was first observed in the UK in 2002 in Wimbledon, London. Since then, leaf miner in horse chestnut trees has spread throughout the majority of England and Wales and was first observed in Scotland...

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  • Is Plane Tree Wilt Coming To the UK?

      Plane Tree Wilt (also known as canker stain disease) is currently rapidly spreading throughout North France and is closing in on Paris. The disease affects ‘plane trees’ which are prominent features of parks and avenues across the world. The disease has already ruined miles of historic tree lined areas in France, such as Canal du Midi. Jago Keen, Chairman of the Arboricultural Association has been reported as saying “If the disease gets to London the impact would be catastrophic”. More than half of London’s trees are plane trees and one of London’s most famous streets, The Mall, is lined...

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  • The History Of Tree Felling

    Tree felling dates back thousands of years – it was used in ancient times as an effective space maker, and still is now. It was almost essential for the survival of mankind, as it provided wood for fires and shelter. Evolution of Tools Tree felling dates back hundreds of years, and was first used to clear areas for farm land, collect firewood and build houses. In ancient times, trees were burned to the ground, which meant it was likely trees could fall in any direction, making it dangerous. Nowadays, we careful plan the direction trees will fall so that objects...

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  • Giant Hogweed Removal

    What? Giant Hogweed, whose botanical name is Heracleum Mantegazzianum, is an invasive plant that spreads rapidly from woods and wild areas. With small white flowers that make little domed or flat umbrella shapes called umbels, the giant hogweed’s stems are green and bristly, sometimes with purple blotches. A close relative of cow parsley – condemned as the countryside killer by the Independent – giant hogweed is an imposing sight when fully grown. The plant originates from North-Western Asia and is a UK non-native – when left alone, they can survive for up to 15 years. Giant hogweed is classed as...

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  • Himalayan Balsam Removal

    What? Himalayan balsam, also known as Impatiens glandulifera, is a purple flowering, non-native plant that infests riverbanks, waste land and gardens. It can grow to 2-3m and flowers between June and October. The attractive weeds are also known as Policeman’s Helmets due to their hooded shape, and were introduced in the 1800s along with giant hogweed, firstly as an exotic plant. It quickly grew out of hand, and in recent years has spread all over England, and suffocated our natural wildlife. Why? Although pretty, it smothers other plants and can kill off native plants that we want to keep as...

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  • Tree Pruning

    What and why? Tree pruning reduces the size of a tree. It is done for many different reasons, for example: The tree may have outgrown its space and looks untidy. Part of the tree is dead or diseased and needs to be removed. It can reduce the risk of disease in some tree species for example it can reduce the risk of Silver Leaf Disease in cherry trees. It can reduce the shade a tree casts over your garden. It can prevent electrical wires or streetlamps being obscured. How? There are many methods of tree pruning that are used in...

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  • Tree Stump Removal

    What? Tree stumps are the part of the tree left after it has been felled and depending on the size of the tree that was cut they can take up a large amount of room on your land.  Tree stumps can also regenerate if the conditions are right. When this happens, small tree sprouts grow from the stump and use the existing root structure for nutrition. If the felled tree was large there may have been a huge amount of nutrients left in the roots and this can cause the shoots to grow very fast this quickly, leading to a very...

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